Actor Spotlight

Dessert-loving Lizzy Greene is no ordinary child actor

Dessert-loving Lizzy Greene is no ordinary child actor

Dallas actress Lizzy Greene
Lizzy Greene as Fannie in Fun House's The Sound of Fannie. Photo courtesy of Fun House Theatre and Film
Dallas actresses Lizzy Greene and Karina Cunningham in "The Secret Origin of Dr. Frankenstein"
Lizzy Greene and Karina Cunningham as real-life grave robbers Burke and Hare in The Secret Origin of Dr. Frankenstein, opening February 20. Photo by Chuck Marcelo
Dallas actresses Lizzy Greene and Kennedy Waterman in "Daffodil Girls"
Lizzy Greene and Kennedy Waterman in the highly acclaimed production of Daffodil Girls, Inspired by David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross. Photo courtesy of Fun House Theatre and Film
Dallas actress Lizzy Greene
Dallas actresses Lizzy Greene and Karina Cunningham in "The Secret Origin of Dr. Frankenstein"
Dallas actresses Lizzy Greene and Kennedy Waterman in "Daffodil Girls"

Ten-year-old Lizzy Greene is no stranger to the spotlight. As part of Fun House Theatre and Film's core talent base, she has appeared in several of the company's shows, playing everything from an ambitious cookie-seller to a talking reindeer to Joseph Stalin (her favorite). Next up: The Secret Origin of Dr. Frankenstein, which runs February 20-23.

Just as Fun House is no ordinary children's theater (best never to call it that), Lizzy is no ordinary child actor. Though she's in high demand onstage and off — she recently traveled to LA for a Disney project — Lizzy took the time to fill out our survey of serious, fun and sometimes ridiculous questions.

Name: Lizzy Greene

Role in The Secret Origin of Dr. Frankenstein: William Burke

Previous work in 2013: I went to California to cut a new CD for Richard Sherman called “On Our Merry Way” for a new online Disney TV show called It’s a Small World.

Hometown: Dallas

First theater role: Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer, and I will always love that role.

First stage show you ever saw: Madeleine

What made you want to do theater: I love the feeling of performing in front of an audience. It makes me feel happy and confident. I don’t get nervous before a show; I’m excited to get out there.

Most challenging role you’ve played: Raimi Roma in Daffodil Girls. I had to research Al Pacino and all of his mannerisms and learn the David Mamet ways.

Special skills: I do a great chicken noise and memorizing material. I can visualize a picture in my head and draw it exactly that way on paper.

Something you’re REALLY bad at: WAITING on anything!

Current pop culture obsession: I love to make up rap songs about people I know, Irish dancing, PVZ and Candy Crush. And I LOVE Batman.

Last book you read: The Shakespeare Stealer

Favorite movie(s): Frozen, Rio and Bolt, because he [the main character] is a German Shepherd.

Favorite musician(s): Macklemore and Katy Perry

Favorite song: “Thrift Shop” and “Dark Horse.” And I love the new “Happy” song.

Dream role: Elsa in Frozen

Favorite play(s): Daffodil Girls, Inspired by David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross and The Sound of  Fannie — both written by Jeff Swearingen 

Favorite musical(s): The Sound of Fannie. There were so many songs from popular musicals in it, and our director, Jimmy [James Chandler], Jeff and Bren [Rapp] rewrote the words to the songs. It was really funny. 

Favorite actors/actresses: Jennifer Lawrence

Favorite food: All sweets, strawberries, grilled cheese sandwich. If I know there is a dessert at the end of a meal, I will eat ANYTHING to get the dessert.

Must-see TV show(s): Dog Whisperer, Dance Moms, Gravity Falls and Dog With a Blog

Something most people don’t know about you: I love German Shepherds and all bugs, and I sing all the time. I paint pictures on my bedroom wall at home, and I absolutely hate chewing gum and French fries.

Place in the world you’d most like to visit: New York to see a Broadway play and Disneyland and Disney World

Pre-show warm-up: Silent rock band dance with Jeff Swearingen

Favorite part about your current role: Scottish accent and costume

Most challenging part about your current role: Scottish accent

Most embarrassing onstage mishap: One time I ad-libbed a line in a play, and when I came off stage, my female director told me to “shut up,” and my brother was there laughing at me.

Most memorable theater moment: In the play The Sound of Fannie, when Fannie realizes her mother has lied to her, and she sings the melody from Phantom of the Opera: “You will curse the day you did not do all that the Fannie asked of you.” And it was dark and the lights were flashing.