Art on the Move

Kimbell Art Museum scores major Scottish collection for 2015

Kimbell Art Museum one of three American museums to show Scottish work

Paul Gauguin, Three Tahitians
Paul Gauguin, Three Tahitians, 1899, oil on canvas. Photo courtesy of National Galleries of Scotland
Sir Henry Raeburn, Revd. Robert Walker, Skating on Duddingston Loch
Sir Henry Raeburn, Revd. Robert Walker, Skating on Duddingston Loch, c. 1795, oil on canvas. Photo courtesy of National Galleries of Scotland
Paul Cezanne, The Big Trees
Paul Cezanne, The Big Trees, c. 1904, oil on canvas.  Photo courtesy of National Galleries of Scotland
Paul Gauguin, Three Tahitians
Sir Henry Raeburn, Revd. Robert Walker, Skating on Duddingston Loch
Paul Cezanne, The Big Trees

The Kimbell Art Museum will be one of only three American museums to display "Botticelli to Braque: Masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland," a major loan coming to the Kimbell June 28–September 20, 2015.

The exhibit, which contains 55 paintings from the Scottish National Gallery, Scottish National Portrait Gallery and Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, will first stop at the Frick Collection in New York City in an abridged version. The full version will then be shown at the de Young Museum in San Francisco before coming to Fort Worth.

As the name of the exhibit suggests, the works that will be on display span more than 400 years. They range from Sandro Botticelli’s Virgin Adoring the Sleeping Christ Child (c. 1490), which hasn't been seen outside Scotland for over 150 years, to Georges Braque’s Candlestick (1911).

The other paintings in the exhibit include a wide variety from the Italian, French, Dutch and Scottish schools of art, with works from such notables as Titian, Diego Velázquez, Sir Anthony van Dyck, Rembrandt van Rijn, Johannes Vermeer, Camille Pissarro, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, John Singer Sargent, Paul Gauguin, Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso and Sir Henry Raeburn.

The addition of "Botticelli to Braque"​ will temporarily increase the Kimbell's collection significantly. Its curated permanent collection of around 350 pieces of art emphasizes quality over quantity, though no one will question the qualitative boost of Scotland's finest.