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Turn ordinary camera photos into something extraordinary at iPhone Artistry workshop

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Archival pigmented ink print, "Suspended Canoes, Interlochen, Michigan," by Dan Burkholder
Suspended Canoes, Interlochen, Michigan, archival pigmented ink print. Photo by Dan Burkholder
Platinum/palladium over gold leaf print, "Typewriter and Lamp," by Dan Burkholder
Typewriter and Lamp, platinum/palladium over gold leaf print. Photo by Dan Burkholder
Archival pigmented ink print, “Grand Central Terminal and Chrysler Building at Dusk,” by Dan Burkholder
Grand Central Terminal and Chrysler Building at Dusk, archival pigmented ink print. Photo by Dan Burkholder
Archival pigmented ink print, "Venice Bridge and Sky," by Dan Burkholder
Venice Bridge and Sky, archival pigmented ink print. Photo by Dan Burkholder
Archival pigmented ink print, “From Bridge near Train Station, Venice,” by Dan Burkholder
From Bridge Near Train Station, Venice, archival pigmented ink print. Photo by Dan Burkholder
Photographer Dan Burkholder
Photographer Dan Burkholder leads two iPhone Artistry workshops at Sun to Moon Gallery, on February 22 and 25. Photo by O. Rufus Lovett
Archival pigmented ink print, "Suspended Canoes, Interlochen, Michigan," by Dan Burkholder
Platinum/palladium over gold leaf print, "Typewriter and Lamp," by Dan Burkholder
Archival pigmented ink print, “Grand Central Terminal and Chrysler Building at Dusk,” by Dan Burkholder
Archival pigmented ink print, "Venice Bridge and Sky," by Dan Burkholder
Archival pigmented ink print, “From Bridge near Train Station, Venice,” by Dan Burkholder
Photographer Dan Burkholder

Most people are mildly obsessed with taking pictures using their smart phones. Yes, we are pointing the finger at all of you who insist on shooting and sharing every dish you’ve ever eaten on Facebook.

But for those who desire quality over quantity, fine art photographer Dan Burkholder is leading two iPhone Artistry workshops at Sun to Moon Gallery this month.

In these classes, Burkholder teaches participants of all skill levels not only how to take better photos with their iPhones, but also how to create works of art. He focuses on camera capture techniques as well as apps that transform ordinary snapshots into something extraordinary.

 Students learn which apps are best for contrast, color, sharpening and stylizing photographs, as well as how to build a personal app suite.

In the February 22 Intro to iPhone Artistry ($169), Burkholder demonstrates a variety of techniques for shooting and stylizing images with the iPhone and iPad. Although this class is recommended for beginners, Burkholder says that even experienced iPhone photographers walk away with lots of new ideas.

The introductory class is largely a lecture format, in which students learn which apps are best for contrast, color, sharpening and stylizing photographs, as well as how to build a personal app suite for optimum capture and processing power.

Burkholder leads the iPhone Artistry Master Class February 25 ($259), a more intimate, hands-on session in which participants develop an iPhone Artistry workflow to match their skill set, subject matter, and the look and feel they want to create. Students shoot and process images throughout the day.

One of the first photographic artists to embrace digital technology in the early 1990s, New York-based Burkholder has taught classes and workshops at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the International Center of Photography in New York and the University of Texas at San Antonio, among others. He currently serves on the advisory board of the Texas Photographic Society.

“Just as it was obvious over 20 years ago that digital imaging was the future of photography, the iPhone represents the next step in the democratization of our medium,” Burkholder says. “We now travel with camera and laboratory, right in the palm of our hand. It doesn’t get much more exciting than that.”

Burkholder says one of the most common flaws he sees with iPhone images is the result of camera shake, but he has an easy solution. “It can be eliminated almost completely once you realize the iPhone snaps its shutter when you remove your finger from the shutter button, not when you tap it. So if you know a shot is coming, hold your finger on the iPhone’s shutter button and then gently lift it at the decisive moment.”

As for apps, Burkholder likes ProHDR for richer tonality. On the processing side, he recommends SnapSeed for editing — and improving — images.

If you’re hungry for more knowledge after those little tidbits, sign up for Burkholder’s workshops before they fill up. Space is limited to 20 seats for the introductory course and 12 seats for the master class. Students who wish to take both workshops can do so at a discount: $399. To sign up, call 214-745-1199.

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The classes work best using iPhone 4 or newer and iPad 2 or newer. Make sure there is enough room on your device to install new apps and that your iTunes account is up to date. Perhaps most important, make sure your iPhone or iPad is fully charged.

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