GMOs Must Go

Nearly 1,000 protesters turn out for Dallas' March Against Monsanto


March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley
March Against Monsanto rally in Dallas
Photo by Marshall Hinsley

On May 25, Dallas joined 435 cities around the world in a March Against Monsanto, to protest the agribusiness giant's genetic and financial manipulation of food crops. Nearly 1,000 people showed up to stage a rally, with a round-trip march from City Hall to the Dallas Farmers Market.

Texas Honeybee Guild's Brandon Pollard is at left. Monsanto's incorporation of chemical pesticides called neonicotinoids into some of its seeds is being fingered as a culprit in the wipeout of the world's bee population.

The rally in Dallas drew participants from all walks of life, who carried homemade signs and chanted, "Say no to GMOs."

To see a video of the march, click here.

Some participants at the Dallas rally brought their children.

The march began at about 1:30 pm, then headed down Young Street to Harwood. Dallas Police Department kept the march orderly by blocking traffic at key intersections. Participants returned the favor by remaining on the sidewalk.

Participants wearing paper hazmat suits highlighted the "revolving door" between Monsanto and the U.S. government, in which positions in the FDA have been filled by former employees of Monsanto.

Some participants got creative with costumes and signage, such as this scarecrow from Wizard of Oz. In March, the U.S. Congress and president passed a bill with a controversial provision that bans courts from halting the sale of Monsanto's genetically modified seeds and protects Monsanto from lawsuits. The Monsanto Protection Act is what spurred many people to protest.

March Against Monsanto participants lined the railing in front of Dallas City Hall. The goal of the protest was to bring attention to Monsanto's practices and the questionable value of GMO crops; a number of countries in Europe have initiated bans of GMO crops entirely.

March Against Monsanto participants headed to Dallas Farmers Market before returning to City Hall for a rally.

The rally drew members of a number of organizations, such as the Texas Honeybee Guild, the Prometheus Project, the Humane League, Mercy For Animals, Veterans For Peace and Occupy Dallas.

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