Pure Class

Unlike those stuck-up cities Houston and Austin, Dallas isn't snobby

Unlike those stuck-up cities Houston and Austin, Dallas isn't snobby

Dallas skyline with Farmers Market
Dallas avoided Travel+Leisure's list of snobbiest cities, because being classy isn't snobby. Photo by Clay Coleman/Dallas CVB

Most cities aspire to be ranked highly in the arts and culture (ahem), but at what price? Is it worth having all that nice stuff if everyone thinks you’re a snob? Luckily, Dallas doesn’t have to worry about such a dilemma.

Travel+Leisure recently unveiled its 20 Snobbiest Cities in America, and Dallas is nowhere to be found. Austin and Houston, however, both had their noses high enough in the air to make the count.

 There’s a difference between snobby and classy. It’s an easy thing to mix up if you don’t know what to look for, which you wouldn’t if you didn’t go to cotillion.

Austin came in at No.19, with snobs possessing a “brainy, offbeat vibe” that echoes through the whole town. UT students’ reputation as “tea sippers” also makes them snobby, though the Aggies think using electricity for purposes other than milking cows at night is elitist.

Houston slid in at No. 17, thanks to “a combination of a rich arts tradition and luxury shopping.” The usual suspects of San Francisco, New York City and Boston took the top three slots.

So how does Dallas manage to avoid being labeled snobby? Well, see, you might not know this, but there’s a difference between snobby and classy. It’s an easy thing to mix up if you don’t know what to look for, which you wouldn’t if you didn’t go to cotillion. They covered it after the fork lesson.

While Houston’s socialites might appear the same as Dallas’ socialites, it’s the difference between wearing the dress and letting the dress wear you. Dallasites just own it better than our fellow Texans. It’s not snobby if it’s true.