« Back to article: Texas drought threatens survival of suburban egrets

Photo of egrets in pet carriers
Rescued baby egrets await treatment at the Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation Center. Photo by Marshall Hinsley
Photo of Julie Norris and Karen Wakeland
Julie Norris of Duncanville and Karen Wakeland of Midlothian have rescued several dozen egrets and taken them to the Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation Center for treatment. Photo by Marshall Hinsley
Photo of Kathy Rogers with egret
Kathy Rogers looks after the egrets and oversees the rehabilitation center. Photo by Marshall Hinsley
Photo of lost egret
A helpless baby egret wanders in a new housing addition. Once on the ground, baby egrets are abandoned by their parents. Photo by Marshall Hinsley
Photo of egret having been killed in traffic
As Julie Norris approached an intersection near the egret rookery, she was alarmed by the number of dead birds on the road. Photo by Marshall Hinsley
Photo of egret being dusted for parasites
A baby egret is treated for parasites by the careful hands of volunteers at the Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation Center. Photo by Marshall Hinsley
Photo of egret rookery
Even from a distance, the thousands of egrets that have taken up temporary residence in DeSoto can be seen filling several acres of tall trees. Photo by Marshall Hinsley