No Party School

Dallas university joins BYU teetotalers on most sober colleges list

Dallas university joins BYU teetotalers on most sober colleges list

University of Dallas
University of Dallas snuck in at No. 20 on the list of most sober colleges, according to the Princeton Review. Photo courtesy of University of Dallas
BYU Creamery Chocolate Milk
Chocolate milk is the beverage of choice at the most sober university in the nation, BYU. Photo courtesy of Brigham Young University
Places-Unique-University of Houston-students
University of Houston students would rather go to class and study than party. Courtesy of University of Houston
University of Dallas
BYU Creamery Chocolate Milk
Places-Unique-University of Houston-students

Making the list of the 20 most sober universities in the country is sure to please school administrators and parents footing tuition bills, so kudos to the teetotaling students at the University of Dallas for just saying no partying and yes to studying.

The school, dubbed the “Catholic university for independent thinkers,” clocked in at No. 20 in the latest sober rankings, compiled by the Princeton Review, joining a band of small private, religious universities for the respected, if not slightly boring, honor. The rest of the list comprises primarily liberal arts colleges and military academies.

Not surprisingly, Brigham Young University, a school owned and operated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, was named the most “stone cold” of the bunch. BYU’s website posted a picture of BYU Creamery chocolate milk, inviting students and school supporters to toast its top no-party ranking for the 17th consecutive year.

The only other Texas school on the list was the University of Houston, neither a private nor religious-based university, which landed at No. 18. No Texas colleges ranked among the top 20 party schools. Top honors for that went to Syracuse University.

The University of Dallas also ranks No. 1 in least beautiful campus, No. 5 for most conservative students, No. 6 for future Rotarians and Daughters of the American Revolution, No. 7 for most religious students, No. 8 for most popular study-abroad program, and No. 9 for This is a Library? (Their question mark, not ours.)

The Princeton Review determined the rankings by visiting campuses across the nation, asking an average of 125 students per campus questions pertaining to partying, studying and other elements of college life. An estimated tens of thousands of college students participated in the study.