Hands Up, Don't Shoot

Peaceful protesters gather in Dallas for National Moment of Silence to remember Michael Brown

Peaceful protesters gather in Dallas for National Moment of Silence

Michael Brown protests in Dallas
About 60 people gathered at the Trinity Continental Bridge in Dallas to protest police brutality in Ferguson, Mo. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
This slogan has gained traction nationally on social media. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
The public outrage reaches across racial lines. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Supporters display their hands as they call for justice. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Anonymous supported the Dallas event. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Participants observe the National Moment of Silence for Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by police on August 9 in Ferguson, Mo. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Many are questioning the use of deadly force against teenager Michael Brown in Missouri.  Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Many supporters brought signs to express their thoughts on the tragedy in Missouri. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
The signs show a solidarity with the victim, 18-year-old Michael Brown. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Many have called for the name of the officer who killed Brown. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
A variety of slogans are being used to represent the movement to hold police accountable. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
The National Moment of Silence was observed at 6:15 pm Central. Photo by Helium Factory
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas
Michael Brown protests in Dallas

Public outrage over the use of deadly force against a Missouri teenager has reached the streets of Dallas. A peaceful gathering of about 60 people convened on the Trinity Continental Bridge for a National Moment of Silence on August 14 to honor victims of police brutality.

Michael Brown, an 18-year-old black man, was shot and killed by police on August 9. His death has spurred a week of protests, some of them violent, in the teen's hometown of Ferguson, Missouri.

 The local gathering included an open discussion about police brutality as well as a moment of silence.

The Dallas gathering was a peaceful one, attendees say, and included an open discussion about police brutality as well as a moment of silence. Ebony Shanae Isaac organized the event, which drew about 60 participants.

"Everyone that spoke inspired me in a different way. There were various views on things but we all discussed them respectfully and THAT is beautiful," Isaac posted on Facebook.

DeAndre Upshaw says he heard about the meeting and hustled over after work. Although the reason for gathering was bleak, Upshaw is encouraged by National Moment of Silence movement.

"It shows that people across the nation stand in solidarity against what happened in Ferguson," he says. "It's really important to note that the world is watching and we are very much invested in what is happening." 

The mostly young crowd reached across racial lines. One woman held a sign that read "We stand together as humans." Members of the hactivist group Anonymous also showed their support, sporting signs that read "Dallas hears you, Ferguson," and "Anonymous is watching." 

Anonymous has released a recording alleged to be the St. Louis police dispatch from the day Brown was killed. It shows confusion about the shooting, which wasn't initially reported by the police but by a witness. "We just got another call stating that there was an officer involved shooting," a woman on the recording says.

Upshaw, who is known for spearheading a campaign to address racism at Uptown bars, hopes the movement in the wake of Brown's death will impact policy. 

"It's happening far too often in our community that people are getting killed and there's no repercussion and no justice. I hope events like this raise awareness and help us think about what we could do as a community to work with legislators to make sure our police are held accountable."