Do the math

Sex crime charges against former Boys & Girls Club exec show advantage of female leadership

Sex crime charges against former Boys & Girls Club exec show advantage of female leadership

Michael Spencer
Michael Spencer participated in a Prime TV interview in September to discuss Alzheimer's. The episode has since been removed from Prime TV's website.  Primetv.com

The news of Michael Spencer's arrest on child sex charges has shocked most people. But one aspect of the case is far from surprising: Spencer's gender.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, women commit about 2 percent of sexual crimes. Even taking into account other studies that believe sex crimes committed by women often go unreported, the percentage is still extremely low (around 5 percent). 

 Perhaps the most disturbing part of the case against Spencer is how similar it appears to recent sex crime headlines such as Jerry Sandusky, the Boy Scouts of America and the Roman Catholic Church.

Spencer spent 17 years with the Boys & Girls Club of America before recently joining the Alzheimer's Association of Greater Dallas as CEO. Earlier this month, a 16-year-old boy came forward in New Mexico with charges that Spencer sexually abused him from ages 8 to 10. Spencer posted bond in Collin County on Wednesday and awaits a hearing in Albuquerque. 

Perhaps the most disturbing part of the case against Spencer is how similar it appears to recent sex crime headlines.

Jerry Sandusky was also an affable man whose chosen career path gave him access to disadvantaged children. In October, the Boy Scouts of America was forced to release files on scores of suspected sex offenders in their midst — men who used their position in the scouts to prey on boys under the guise of mentorship.

It is important to note that no ties have yet been identified to Spencer's alleged victim and the Boys & Girls Club of America; however, the organization has launched an internal investigation in light of the claims. Based on the number of women the Dallas chapter of the Boys & Girls Club of America employs, the group has a better chance of coming out of this unscathed than the Boy Scouts or say, the Roman Catholic Church.

For organizations that work with children, hiring more women at all levels of leadership is not a fool-proof recipe to eliminate sex crimes. But statistically it stands to reason that such a practice would at the very least lower the number of children exposed to sexual predators.