Planet-friendly Tee Party

New Dallas company spreads eco-awareness with catchy T-shirts

New Dallas company spreads eco-awareness with catchy T-shirts

Mad Leaf T-shirt
Mad Leaf shirts are made from recycled plastic bottles and organic cotton.  Mad Leaf/Facebook
Mad Leaf
A closer look at this Mad Leaf tee reveals the tiger's face is composed of leaves. Mad Leaf/Facebook
Mad Leaf T-shirt
Mad Leaf

Brent Martin is a man on a mission: to spread environmental awareness with his Dallas-based sustainable clothing brand, Mad Leaf.

“A lot of people are not aware of eco-alternatives that are simple and extremely effective with helping the environment,” says Martin, who launched his company in July. “An important move to protect the eco-system is the increased use of organic cotton.”

 “We are hoping to bridge the gap between educated environmentalists and people who might not think of eco-options,” says Mad Leaf founder Brent Martin.

For its T-shirts and accessories, Mad Leaf uses organic cotton combined with a durable polyester made with recycled plastic bottles. The result is a super-soft tee made in the U.S.A.

Martin’s goal for Mad Leaf is to bring some fun into the eco conversation and for people to be proud of their clothing. “We are hoping to bridge the gap between educated environmentalists and people who might not think of eco-options,” he says.

“Mad Leaf is the catalyst to disprove stereotypes regarding eco.”

All T-shirts feature environmentally focused prints, including a “mad” leaf, a tiger composed of leaves, a beach scene featuring a guitar and a “raw by nature” slogan. Shirts are $25; ball caps are $27. Everything can be purchased online.

Martin also supports Clothes4Souls, a nonprofit that donates used clothing and creates small businesses in poverty-stricken areas. One dollar from every shirt purchased is donated to Clothes4Souls.

“I immediately made a connection with their team and felt their passion to aid others in need,” says Martin, who plans to help more nonprofits in the future through shirt campaigns.

“We are continuously looking at new designs and future offerings; our goal is to move into more shirt cuts, casual wear and active wear,” he adds.