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Whimsical surprise awaits upstairs in historic Highland Park mansion

Whimsical surprise awaits upstairs in historic Highland Park mansion

3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
 The Highland Park Colonial Revival was built in 1916 for Bishop H.T. Moore, the Episcopalian Bishop in Dallas from 1924-1945.  Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
The bishop was known to marry couples in the living room. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
 The 200-year-old pine floors were installed over 100 years ago. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
The master bedroom originally was a sleeping porch. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
The master bath has a spa-sized tub. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
There are surprises waiting upstairs. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
Artist Gillian Bradshaw-Smith created a mural inspired by a 1957 Lionel Train catalog. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
The train mural appears in a surprise room on the third floor. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
The train room could be used as a media or play room. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
The kitchen includes a breakfast room. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
A lovely patio overlooks an expansive backyard. Photo courtesy of Dave Perry-Miller
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale
3621 Cornell Ave., Highland Park Colonial, for sale

When you think of a Highland Park Colonial Revival home, the words that come to mind might be traditional, stately, classic, and gracious. The Colonial Revival has been and continues to be the most popular style in America. You’ll see it reimagined and reinvented by some of the best architects and builders in the country because it’s the very essence of home.

This historic home now on the market, at 3621 Cornell Ave., ticks all the boxes for anyone looking for a family home in a great neighborhood — a family that appreciates history and wants to put down deep roots. There's even a colorful surprise upstairs.

But first, a little history. Hal Thompson designed the home. If you don't know Thompson, here’s a primer from the folks at Preservation Dallas:

"The architecture of Henry Bowers (Hal) Thomson has come to represent one of the most important periods in Dallas’ history — referred to by many as its golden era. During the early 1900s, Dallas was experiencing an economic boom from oil, gas, and cotton. As the city’s elite became even wealthier, Dallasites — like many Americans — were interested in replicating the great houses of Europe here at home. Thomson, a classically trained architect who had studied abroad, became the architect of choice among the prominent citizens of Dallas."

The Highland Park Colonial Revival was built in 1916 for Bishop H.T. Moore, the Episcopalian Bishop in Dallas from 1924-1945. He was the 2nd bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas. The original bill of sale shows he bought it for $11,176.89. That was a lot of money in 1916. The bishop was known to marry couples in the living room of his home before young men headed off to the war.

Of course, the 5,707-square-foot home has been renovated and updated over the years, while retaining a lot of original features. The 200-year-old pine floors, for instance, were installed over 100 years ago. After the remodel, the client submitted an application to recognize this property as an architecturally significant home, and the designation was granted by the Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society.

This home has four bedrooms, five bathrooms, and a powder bath.

“The current master was originally a sleeping porch,” Dave Perry-Miller listing agent Julie Boren said. “Originally it appears there were two masters that connected between the closet. Now there are two closets.”

But the best part is the charming surprise that awaits at the top of the house.

In 2006, the owners hired noted artist Gillian Bradshaw-Smith to create a mural inspired by a 1957 Lionel Train catalog. Bradshaw-Smith has done some stunning work in homes across America, and this creation is no exception. You enter a whole new world on the third floor, and if trains are not your thing, the space easily could transform into a media room.

Boren said her favorite thing about this historic mansion is not a room or a design feature.

“It’s how you feel when you enter the home,” she said. “You feel the stature and history, but at the same time, you have a very modern home with high ceilings, walls of windows, and French doors that offer amazing light.”

The home is listed for $3.975 million.

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A version of this story originally was published on Candy's Dirt.

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