Designer Real Estate

Dallas designer’s personal touch differentiates this for-sale Park Cities pad

Dallas designer’s personal touch differentiates this Park Cities pad

4432 McFarlin
Designer Amy Berry's home at 4432 McFarlin Blvd. is on the market for $2,395,000. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
The entryway is so inviting. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
The formal living room is spacious, but a fireplace makes it feel cozy. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
Designer touches can be seen in the pops of color. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
The kitchen is light and bright with just the smallest hint of color.   Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
Exposed brick and wide hallways help this house stand out. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
Have you ever seen a TV room this pretty? Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
Berry added a bar to the library to increase the functionality of the space. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
The canopy bed in the master showcases Berry's traditional style. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
Three guestrooms mean there is adequate room for both a growing family and visitors. Photo by Sean Gallagher
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin
4432 McFarlin

A Dallas interior designer has done all the work for one lucky homebuyer. Amy Berry put her home at 4432 McFarlin Blvd. on the market — an announcement she made the 21st century way: on Instagram.

Listed for $2,395,000 with mother-in-law Christy Berry of Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s, the 5,046-square-foot home has four bedrooms and four-and-a-half baths. But more important, Amy, a new star on the Dallas design scene, put her stamp all over the place.

The home has undergone a complete renovation, with both functional and aesthetic improvements. A refreshed facade, exposed brick in the family and breakfast rooms, and wide hallways are just some of the tweaks that make this property stand out from others at this price point.

“Everything in the home was done intentionally,” Christy says. “The floorplan of the house previously wasn’t being used the way it could have been, and now the living spaces function in the way people live.”

The new owner can appreciate the home’s heritage (built in 1950) and its modern improvements; there are no updates to tackle. Plus, a designer has already thought about the details — like the pretty emerald paint in the dining room, thoughtful built-ins in the library, Schumacher embroidered grasscloth in the butler’s pantry, and light fixtures suited to every room — that usually flummox us layman.

“The library really highlights how built-ins can transform a room when they’re thoughtfully planned for,” Christy says. “A bar was added to increase the functionality of that space, and between that and the fireplace, it’s one of the best spots in the house to curl up.

“There are so many places where the details really make the design,” Christy adds. “The powder bath, the TV room — this was really a home designed out of love.”