Heavenly Listing

Divine Uptown Dallas listing offers endless possibilities

Divine Uptown Dallas listing offers endless possibilities

2700 Fairmount St. balcony
The former church at 2700 Fairmount can be used for office space or residential living. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St.
You could own the property — and its adjacent parking lot — for only $8.4 million. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St. front doors
Some of the bricks date back to 1910, and other features capture the building's history. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St. stairway
The space is light, bright, and open. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St.
This would make a great showroom or open-plan office space. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St. altar
The altar is sure to be a talking point. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St. balcony
Tongue-in-groove beams crisscross the ceiling. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St. dining room
Though it was first a church, it's easier than anticipated to imagine the building as a home. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St.
The added-on office space in the rear could house lots of workers. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St. kitchen
Up a spiral staircase is the kitchen in the additional apartment, and up the ladder is the bedroom. Photo courtesy of Briggs Freeman
2700 Fairmount St. balcony
2700 Fairmount St.
2700 Fairmount St. front doors
2700 Fairmount St. stairway
2700 Fairmount St.
2700 Fairmount St. altar
2700 Fairmount St. balcony
2700 Fairmount St. dining room
2700 Fairmount St.
2700 Fairmount St. kitchen

In the heart of Uptown sits a church that shows buildings can have second, third, and even fourth lives. 2700 Fairmount St. has a staggering price tag of $8.4 million, but its fascinating history and endless possibilities make that figure seem justified. 

Previously used as a creative office space, it could also be a company headquarters, home, or multi-family living space. The building is zoned for a variety of retail, office, and single-family use, and it's in one of the best locations in Uptown, within walking distance to The Crescent, McKinney Avenue retail, restaurants, and everything in the Turtle Creek and Cedar Springs areas.

It, too, is an architecturally significant historical church designed by Herbert Miller Greene (architect of the very first Dallas Morning News building, the downtown Neiman Marcus, and other local landmarks) and his partner James P. Hubbell. It was completed in 1910 when commissioned as Westminster Presbyterian Church. The Beaux Arts structure has been carefully preserved and creatively renovated.

First a church, the building was then home to the Tech Wildcatters and was known as the Tech Church. The startup accelerator company moved in around 2010 and left in 2013. Real estate agent Bryan Crawford at Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International says Ray Washburne owned it last, before the current owner purchased it in 2013. That owner, by the way, is in the fossil and mineral business, hence the huge dinosaur pictured in the sanctuary.

Because those sanctuary spaces are large and open, they would be ideal for a showroom or open-flow office space. The conference room or potential executive office space is perched high above the sanctuary-turned-showroom, enclosed in glass and surrounded by original plaster moldings. There are several criscross beams in this room, and the ceiling is a must-see of tongue in groove. 

A two-story structure in the rear consists of 14 office suites, a sound studio, and several other open-plan office rooms. Uptown is slim on parking, but the lot across the street at 2518 Mahon St. is included and holds 20 cars, while there are seven spots in the side pull-in space.

There is a unique living area as well. As soon as you enter the church, to the left is the brides’ room with a bathroom in a small cellar below. To the right is a curious little apartment, with three floors accessed by spiral staircases and ladders. Up another attached ladder is a roof deck with an incredible view of Dallas.

Just imagine the possibilities.

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A version of this story originally was published on Candy's Dirt.