Carrollton Goes Cajun

Carrollton diners get muffaletta fix with Po Boys Cajun Food to Geaux

Carrollton diners get muffaletta fix with Po Boys Cajun Food to Geaux

Po Boys Cajun
Muffalettas are on the menu at Po Boys Cajun Food to Geaux in Carrollton. Photo courtesy of Po Boys Cajun
Po Boys Cajun
Bourbon Street murals are on the walls at Po Boys Cajun Food to Geaux. Photo courtesy of Po Boys Cajun
Po Boys Cajun
Po Boys Cajun

Restaurateur-caterers Janet Jeffords Parr and Brad Parr have expanded their Carrollton empire with the opening of Po Boys Cajun Food to Geaux, a new casual Cajun spot featuring classics such as gumbo, jambalaya, and red beans and rice.

The Parrs, who've owned No Worries Catering since 1996, entered the restaurant scene when they opened Misto Bistro restaurant in March 2011. Misto's broad menu — with everything from pastas to strogonoff — has received positive reviews but didn't lend itself to the kind of takeout they knew they could execute, Janet says.

"We wanted to find a way to do a takeout food service that would work in the North Carrollton area," she says. "We tried many of the menu items at our Misto Bistro restaurant prior to opening and felt that Cajun was the best menu for our new location."

The menu features 14 varieties of po' boys, including a roast beef with "debris-style gravy," sausage, oyster, shrimp, catfish, chicken, and ham and cheese. A vegetarian option comes with onions, red bell pepper and goat cheese.

Other dishes include gumbo, meat pies, a muffaletta sandwich that's big enough for two to share, and an intriguing item called a "debris gravy sandwich." Desserts include pecan praline bread pudding and beignets.

"We wanted to do the Cajun essentials, like gumbo, jambalaya, and red beans and rice," Janet says. "But we also offer a couple of lighter options, including salads and sandwiches."

Po Boys occupies a spot the Parrs use for their catering operation. The dining room has limited seating; they intend to add outdoor seating once the weather warms up.

Janet says that the area has more Louisiana natives than they anticipated. "We were surprised how many people that live in this area attended LSU, or previously had lived in Louisiana," she says.

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