Oak Cliff Dining Scene

Oak Cliff eatery Stock & Barrel fulfills lifelong dream for chef-owner Jon Stevens

Oak Cliff eatery Stock & Barrel fulfills lifelong dream for chef-owner

Jon Stevens
Chef Jon Stevens will open Stock & Barrel in April. Photo courtesy of Jon Stevens
Stock & Barrel
Stevens' avocado and seafood salad with creme fraiche and caviar. Photo courtesy of Stock & Barrel
Chef Jon Stevens, Mico Rodriguez
Chef Jon Stevens most recently worked with Mico Rodriguez at Mesero Miguel. Photo by Jason Acton
Jon Stevens
Stock & Barrel
Chef Jon Stevens, Mico Rodriguez

Chef Jon Stevens has remained veiled about his new Oak Cliff restaurant Stock & Barrel, opening in the old Safety Glass building on West Davis Street. But as its sometime-in-April launch nears, Stevens has opened up about the concept, revealing that it represents his "lifelong dream as a chef."

"Over my 20-year career, I’ve been fortunate to work with some of the most talented chefs in the country and have learned firsthand what it takes to build and sustain a successful restaurant," he says in an explanation of the restaurant's roots. "I am putting my heart and soul into the creation of Stock & Barrel, not in hopes of being the next 'it' restaurant for a few months, rather with the end goal of becoming a mainstay on the Dallas dining scene for years to come."

 "The rotisserie is vastly underutilized in today’s best kitchens," Stevens says. "Suckling pig, bone-in rib roasts and exotic fowl are just a few of the items I'll be slow roasting on the spit."

Stevens began his chef career in San Francisco at Mecca, Jardinière and the Dining Room at the Ritz Carlton; he says that his time in California taught him that local farmers are the lifeblood of any successful restaurant. In Dallas, he's worked at The Mercury, Aurora, Jasper's, Nosh and, most recently, Mesero Miguel, where he's developed a love for "unpretentious yet refined American dishes" with Spanish, French and Italian influences.

The "stars" in his kitchen will be the wood-burning grill and rotisserie, where he'll burn a blend of local Texas woods to give the "perfect hint of smoke" to the meats, fish and vegetables grilled nightly.

"I've long felt the rotisserie is vastly underutilized in today’s best kitchens," he says. "Suckling pig, bone-in rib roasts and exotic fowl are just a few of the items I'll be slow roasting on the spit."

Diners can also expect to see hand-cut pastas as well as some of Stevens' signature dishes, such as baked eggplant and goat cheese dumplings. But perhaps the most meaningful development on the menu is his righteous elevation of the noble spud.

"I am dedicating an entire section of the menu to the art of fried potatoes," he says. "French fries are a comfort food for me, and I've developed a menu above and beyond sweet potato and shoestring options with different sauces to mix and match with each offering."

The restaurant will have 2,800 square feet of indoor space, plus a dog-friendly patio. A fan of open kitchens and the guest interaction that encourages, Stevens designed a 14-seat kitchen counter to catch the kitchen action up close. Stock & Barrel will serve dinner Tuesday–Sunday and brunch on Saturday and Sunday.

His location on West Davis Street is just a stone's throw from Bishop Arts.

"I chose Bishop Arts not only because of the people and sense of community in the neighborhood, but also because it has truly become Dallas’ most exciting dining destination," he says. "There are some incredible, chef-driven restaurants in Oak Cliff, and I’m very thankful that I’ll be a part of that scene."