New Kolache Shop

Greenville Avenue gets kolaches and coffee courtesy of Bohemian Cafe

Greenville Avenue gets kolaches and coffee courtesy of Bohemian Cafe

Kolaches
Kolaches are on the menu at Bohemian Cafe on Greenville Avenue. Photo courtesy of Anna Ginsberg, Cookie Madness

Greenville Avenue gets yet another small, indie, possibly artisanal foodstuff shop with Bohemian Cafe, which specializes in kolaches, coffee and other goodies. It's going into the old Jack's Southern Comfort Food space, and it is slated to open in October, says owner Jason Horne.

The shop will sell kolaches, klobasneks, hot dogs, coffee from Noble Coyote, tea, beer and wine; it will also feature live music and free Wi-Fi. Bohemian Cafe will be open from 6 am to 10 pm, with kolaches available as long as they still have them. They'll also serve Texas and Czech foods for breakfast, lunch and dinner such as "Czech dogs," served in a kolache-style bun or cornmeal battered and fried, plus dumplings, chili and goulash. 

 "It's something I've wanted in Dallas for a long time, and I think a lot of people have as well," says owner Jason Horne.

Horne knows his kolaches: His grandfather was a first-generation immigrant from the Czech Republic and his mother baked the pastries all his life.

"Mom's maiden name was Barcuch," he says. "I grew up helping her make these things. It's a time-consuming process. But it's something I've wanted in Dallas for a long time, and I think a lot of people have as well.

"I will always stop in West to pick up kolaches. If it weren't for West, I wouldn't be doing this. Czech Stop paved the way."

He'll offer the traditional flavors but also has some twists in mind.

"Prune, poppy seed and cream cheese, those are the three constants," he says. "The true Czechs like my aunt, she said, 'You could get away with selling only those three.' But we're taking it further. I don't want to say yet what some of my creations are until I nail down the menu, but we'll get creative and try some things and see how they do."

He'll also have klobasneks, which are kolache-like pastries filled with sausage. "Klobasneks are not really kolaches. I'm the first to point that out," he says. "But if people want to call it a kolache, I'm fine with that as long as they enjoy it."

Horne, who is 42, is a musician who has also worked in the corporate world, in advertising and interactive development and design.

"I worked throughout the dot-com boom and still love doing it, but this is something I've wanted to do for a while. It's more of a passion project," he says. "I've got a player piano in there and my standup bass. I want to create an atmosphere where I want to be there."

He has the grand opening set for October 13. "That was my mother's birthday. She passed away in May," he says. "That's a huge part of it. It was something we wanted to do together."

ADVERTISEMENT