Desserts Aplenty

Greenville Avenue's Remedy promises big dessert program from new chef

Greenville Avenue's Remedy promises big dessert program from new chef

Remedy chef Guillermo Tristan
Chef Guillermo Tristan will be making pies and sundaes — but no cakes — at Remedy. Photo courtesy of Remedy
Remedy chef Danyele McPherson
Chef Danyele McPherson's childhood will inspire her menu at Remedy. Photo courtesy of Remedy
Remedy chef Guillermo Tristan
Remedy chef Danyele McPherson

The Greenville Avenue restaurant-not-soda shop Remedy has an opening date and chef team. Created by restaurateur Elias Pope, the HG Sply Co. sibling will open in late November or early December with Danyele McPherson as executive chef and Guillermo "GMO" Tristan as executive pastry chef.

"The menu is inspired by food my mom would make when I was growing up," McPherson says in a release. "Remedy is not about sourcing exotic ingredients; it's about sourcing the best ingredients possible and making the best fish sandwich, BLT, grilled cheese, pork chop, pot pie, etc. that we possibly can. We will also be serving a rotating selection of vegetarian dishes."

The dessert program includes pies, such as peach and coconut cream, and rotating sundaes, and it will be just as focused as the food menu.

"This is a simple pie and ice cream menu — no cakes," Tristan says. "Pies will be made fresh daily and will be truly seasonal, with flavors that change often."

Three sundaes will stay on the menu all of the time, plus three rotating flavors. "All of the sundaes are named after someone important in our lives, as a way of paying homage to people that helped us along the way," he says.

Pope, who originally envisioned a soda fountain concept, has allowed the restaurant to evolve in response to the ideas of his chefs.

McPherson's childhood in Waynesville, North Carolina, shows up in dishes like hushpuppies, braised greens, and rice-based dishes like hoppin' John and perlau, as well as Midwestern staples like boiled potatoes with butter and parsley, fresh sweet corn, and fried bologna sandwiches.

Tristan was born in Houston and raised in Dallas, with a family tree that spans from Mexico to Texas. His career includes stops at Montauk, New York, under Chef John "Okie" Jones; Lakewood Country Club; Kitchen 1924; Cock and Bull; Charlie Palmer at The Joule, where he worked with pastry chef Ruben Torano; Boulevardier; and FT33.  

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