Klyde Warren Park Tasting

Savor shared plates at Klyde Warren Park's elegant new restaurant

Savor shared plates at Klyde Warren Park's elegant new restaurant

Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Tomato burrata salad with chile-dusted watermelon and mole verde at Savor. Photo by Teresa Gubbins
Savor, Klyde Warren park
Savor at Klyde Warren Park is almost entirely made of glass. Photo by Teresa Gubbins
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Yuzu tart. Photo by Teresa Gubbins
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Salmon with celery root puree. Photo by Teresa Gubbins
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Calamari and shrimp. Photo by Teresa Gubbins
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Chocolate-peanut butter pretzel bite. Photo by Teresa Gubbins
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Savor, Klyde Warren park
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Savor, Klyde Warren Park
Savor, Klyde Warren Park

Just two weeks into its opening, Savor, the high-profile restaurant at Klyde Warren Park, brought in some food blog folk to sample a few menu items and check out the new digs.

Chef John Coleman walked the group through a few courses, beginning with fried calamari and shrimp and ending with a pretty medley of desserts to be shared. The restaurant is officially pegged as a gastropub, and that does mesh with its casual atmosphere and menu. But the decor feels minimalist and elegant.

Architect Thomas Phifer did the pavilion; Bill Johnson of the Johnson Studios in Atlanta did the interior. The restaurant is a chrome-and-glass stunner with an entire outer shell made of glass, to enable views of Klyde Warren Park.

Clad in white marble and pale wood, the guts of the restaurant — kitchen, wine storage, restrooms — form a core at the center. Dining spaces surround the center, with another circle of seating on the patios that ring the exterior. The bar forms a dramatic oval with a shelf of liquor bottles floating overhead.

One cool thing: There are three wines on tap, including a Chardonnay, Cabernet and rose, which Coleman happily predicted would significantly reduce the amount of waste.

Dishes sampled exemplified Coleman's approach of keeping things simple but good.

  • A tomato-burrata salad had heirloom tomatoes, cubes of watermelon dusted with chile, soft burrata cheese and a green "mole" verde.
  • Cornbread crab cakes were made from Jonah and blue crab, served with avocado, mango and pickled red onion slaw. A Thai curry sauce included corn puree that added sweetness and texture.
  • Roasted salmon had been smoked and cured in bourbon; it came with fennel and apple chutney over a base of celery-root puree.
  • Braised short rib was accompanied by cheddar mac and cheese, featuring ear-shaped orecchiette pasta.

Other menu items include deviled eggs, pork belly meatballs, flatbreads, salads, gnocchi, scallops, roasted chicken, and shrimp and grits. Prices range from $7 to $17 for shared plates and starters, and $19 to $27 for entrees.

Desserts by pastry chef Julie Vorce, who worked with Coleman at the Ritz-Carlton, are a crazy medley, served in mini form at $3 apiece, to be shared by the table. They include German chocolate cake, ice cream sandwich, pop tart, chocolate-peanut-butter pretzel bite, banana split, yuzu tart, spiced pumpkin trifle and crème brûlée.

For now Savor is open for dinner, with lunch hours coming in a few weeks.

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