Man Up Lance

Unremorseful Lance Armstrong whines about finally facing consequences for years of cheating and lies

Unremorseful Lance Armstrong whines about finally facing consequences

Lance Armstrong
Lance Armstrong admits to doping on a grand scale but doesn't think he deserves a harsher punishment than anyone else. Lancearmstrong.com
Lance Armstrong, Tour de France jerseys, November 2012
Armstrong tweeted out this cheeky photo of his Tour de France jerseys after being stripped of his seven victories. Lance Armstrong/Twitter
Lance Armstrong in Oprah Winfrey interview
Armstrong's supposed mea culpa interview with Oprah failed to cast the cycling star in a remorseful or even sympathetic light. Courtesy photo
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Lance Armstrong says he just wants to be treated like everyone else. Photo courtesy of Livestrong
Lance Armstrong, Anna Hansen at Aspen Art Museum
Armstrong made headlines when he stepped out with girlfriend Anna Hansen in Aspen. Photo by © Billy Farrell/BFANYC.com
Lance Armstrong
Lance Armstrong, Tour de France jerseys, November 2012
Lance Armstrong in Oprah Winfrey interview
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Lance Armstrong, Anna Hansen at Aspen Art Museum

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong is apparently having a rough time dealing with the consequences of lying and cheating his way to the top of the Tour de France. In an interview with the BBC on November 10, Armstrong lamented his self-directed plot in life. 

"It's been real tough. I've paid a high price in terms of my standing within the sport, my reputation, certainly financially because the lawsuits have continued to pile up," Armstrong told the BBC. "I have experienced massive personal loss, massive loss of wealth, while others have truly capitalized on this story."

For years, Armstrong vehemently denied doping rumors, going as far as suing his accusers for libel and defamation.

 "If everyone gets a free pass, I'm happy to take a free pass," Armstrong told the BBC.

But his throne of lies came crashing down in late 2012, when Armstrong stepped down from Livestrong and was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

With his back against the wall in January 2013, Armstrong at long last admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. He also returned a bronze medal from the 2000 Olympics.

In the aftermath of his confession, Armstrong lost his lavish Austin mansion. He sold it ostensibly to pay massive legal fees related to lawsuits by his former sponsor, insurer and teammate. Further legal action is believed to be in the works. 

Armstrong's supposed mea culpa interview with Oprah failed to cast the cycling star in a remorseful or even sympathetic light. Instead, he appeared defiant and cocky. 

In his recent interview with the BBC, Armstrong projected self-righteousness as he pled for equitable treatment from the International Cycling Union, which has the final say on whether or not Armstrong and others who admitted to doping will ever be able to race professionally again. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency banned Armstrong from cycling for life in 2012.

"If everyone gets the death penalty, then I'll take the death penalty," Armstrong said. "If everyone gets a free pass, I'm happy to take a free pass. If everyone gets six months, then I'll take my six months."

It's a bold move for Armstrong to ask for fairness after making a career out of systematically cheating drug tests. After all, Armstrong always insisted he belonged in a league of his own. It's only fair that the International Cycling Union treat him that way.