Photo courtesy of Peter Halley

"Cell Grids," Peter Halley’s first exhibition in Texas in more than 15 years, presents a unique series of paintings made from 2015 to the present. "Cell Grids" showcases a surprising vein of Halley’s work, paintings in which one element of his distinctive iconography, his intensely colored rectilinear “cells,” is isolated and arranged into syncopated grids, bringing his work into dialogue with the structural grid of classic Modernism as represented in the work of Piet Mondrian, Agnes Martin, Andy Warhol and others.

Since the 1980s, Halley’s paintings have blurred the distinction between geometric abstraction and representation. In Halley’s paintings, monochromatic squares become “prisons” and “cells,” while straight lines become the “conduits” connecting them.

The paintings on view in "Cell Grids" are a focused presentation of a new direction in Halley’s work developed over the last six years in which the artist has isolated a single element of his personal iconography, the intensely colored rectilinear “cells,” arranging them into large-scale syncopated grids.

Following the opening day, the exhibit will be on display through February 13.

"Cell Grids," Peter Halley’s first exhibition in Texas in more than 15 years, presents a unique series of paintings made from 2015 to the present. "Cell Grids" showcases a surprising vein of Halley’s work, paintings in which one element of his distinctive iconography, his intensely colored rectilinear “cells,” is isolated and arranged into syncopated grids, bringing his work into dialogue with the structural grid of classic Modernism as represented in the work of Piet Mondrian, Agnes Martin, Andy Warhol and others.

Since the 1980s, Halley’s paintings have blurred the distinction between geometric abstraction and representation. In Halley’s paintings, monochromatic squares become “prisons” and “cells,” while straight lines become the “conduits” connecting them.

The paintings on view in "Cell Grids" are a focused presentation of a new direction in Halley’s work developed over the last six years in which the artist has isolated a single element of his personal iconography, the intensely colored rectilinear “cells,” arranging them into large-scale syncopated grids.

Following the opening day, the exhibit will be on display through February 13.

"Cell Grids," Peter Halley’s first exhibition in Texas in more than 15 years, presents a unique series of paintings made from 2015 to the present. "Cell Grids" showcases a surprising vein of Halley’s work, paintings in which one element of his distinctive iconography, his intensely colored rectilinear “cells,” is isolated and arranged into syncopated grids, bringing his work into dialogue with the structural grid of classic Modernism as represented in the work of Piet Mondrian, Agnes Martin, Andy Warhol and others.

Since the 1980s, Halley’s paintings have blurred the distinction between geometric abstraction and representation. In Halley’s paintings, monochromatic squares become “prisons” and “cells,” while straight lines become the “conduits” connecting them.

The paintings on view in "Cell Grids" are a focused presentation of a new direction in Halley’s work developed over the last six years in which the artist has isolated a single element of his personal iconography, the intensely colored rectilinear “cells,” arranging them into large-scale syncopated grids.

Following the opening day, the exhibit will be on display through February 13.

WHEN

WHERE

Dallas Contemporary
161 Glass St.
Dallas, TX 75207
https://www.dallascontemporary.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.