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Photo courtesy of Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture

Once upon a time fishermen who launched their pirogues from the coast of Senegal could dip their hands into the ocean and pull out fish as big as their thighs. But in an Atlantic decimated by Anthropocene, fish are harder and harder to find. “The sea is broken,” fishermen say. “The sea is empty.” How does a changing ocean shape civilizations in flux? What is it like to live on this foremost frontier, between terra firma and the unfathomable, where all boundaries are permeable: between plenty and nothing, between myth and fact, between the storyteller and the story. How do we understand the threat to environmental and human diversity—while also celebrating our humanness and advancing a sense of wonderment that is essential to our sincere involvement in our planet?

Anna Badkhen will return to the Dallas Institute to talk about her most recent sojourn in the developing world and unveil Fisherman’s Blues, a book of magical nonfiction, set in Senegal, about the porous boundary between terra firma and the unfathomable.

Once upon a time fishermen who launched their pirogues from the coast of Senegal could dip their hands into the ocean and pull out fish as big as their thighs. But in an Atlantic decimated by Anthropocene, fish are harder and harder to find. “The sea is broken,” fishermen say. “The sea is empty.” How does a changing ocean shape civilizations in flux? What is it like to live on this foremost frontier, between terra firma and the unfathomable, where all boundaries are permeable: between plenty and nothing, between myth and fact, between the storyteller and the story. How do we understand the threat to environmental and human diversity—while also celebrating our humanness and advancing a sense of wonderment that is essential to our sincere involvement in our planet?

Anna Badkhen will return to the Dallas Institute to talk about her most recent sojourn in the developing world and unveil Fisherman’s Blues, a book of magical nonfiction, set in Senegal, about the porous boundary between terra firma and the unfathomable.

Once upon a time fishermen who launched their pirogues from the coast of Senegal could dip their hands into the ocean and pull out fish as big as their thighs. But in an Atlantic decimated by Anthropocene, fish are harder and harder to find. “The sea is broken,” fishermen say. “The sea is empty.” How does a changing ocean shape civilizations in flux? What is it like to live on this foremost frontier, between terra firma and the unfathomable, where all boundaries are permeable: between plenty and nothing, between myth and fact, between the storyteller and the story. How do we understand the threat to environmental and human diversity—while also celebrating our humanness and advancing a sense of wonderment that is essential to our sincere involvement in our planet?

Anna Badkhen will return to the Dallas Institute to talk about her most recent sojourn in the developing world and unveil Fisherman’s Blues, a book of magical nonfiction, set in Senegal, about the porous boundary between terra firma and the unfathomable.

WHEN

WHERE

The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture
2719 Routh St.
Dallas, TX 75201
http://dallasinstitute.org/the-haul-and-cast-of-being-human/

TICKET INFO

$35
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