Photo courtesy of Stephen D’Onofrio

Galleri Urbane will present Stephen D’Onofrio: "The Arborist," the fourth solo exhibition by the Philadelphia-based artist. After a successful season showing at the Untitled Miami and Spring Break New York fairs, D’Onofrio returns to Galleri Urbane with a highly anticipated body of new work.

Here, the botanical subjects that have peppered D’Onofrio’s canvases in the past are arranged into representational depictions of flora seated in large porcelain pots. The artist’s investigations in the canon of Europe's illustration masters, such as Basilius Besler’s (1561-1629) botanical encyclopedia Florilegium and Giovanna Garzoni’s (1600-1670) work, have been reconsidered as new compositions which allude to the legacy of botanical illustration while remaining mindful that images become kitsch with age.

Formal considerations in the representation of plants is the most immediately recognizable element in D’Onofrio’s newest body of work, as it is the nature of depiction most endemic to the history of botanical illustration. The stem of a plant may be presented as separated from its root, so that both items can be shown in their differing characteristics. Flowers and fruit may be painted at a range of blossom and ripening. Leaves of a plant can appear full and lilting. Perspective and depth are impacted for the purpose of education; such is the nature of illustration.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through May 14.

Galleri Urbane will present Stephen D’Onofrio: "The Arborist," the fourth solo exhibition by the Philadelphia-based artist. After a successful season showing at the Untitled Miami and Spring Break New York fairs, D’Onofrio returns to Galleri Urbane with a highly anticipated body of new work.

Here, the botanical subjects that have peppered D’Onofrio’s canvases in the past are arranged into representational depictions of flora seated in large porcelain pots. The artist’s investigations in the canon of Europe's illustration masters, such as Basilius Besler’s (1561-1629) botanical encyclopedia Florilegium and Giovanna Garzoni’s (1600-1670) work, have been reconsidered as new compositions which allude to the legacy of botanical illustration while remaining mindful that images become kitsch with age.

Formal considerations in the representation of plants is the most immediately recognizable element in D’Onofrio’s newest body of work, as it is the nature of depiction most endemic to the history of botanical illustration. The stem of a plant may be presented as separated from its root, so that both items can be shown in their differing characteristics. Flowers and fruit may be painted at a range of blossom and ripening. Leaves of a plant can appear full and lilting. Perspective and depth are impacted for the purpose of education; such is the nature of illustration.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through May 14.

Galleri Urbane will present Stephen D’Onofrio: "The Arborist," the fourth solo exhibition by the Philadelphia-based artist. After a successful season showing at the Untitled Miami and Spring Break New York fairs, D’Onofrio returns to Galleri Urbane with a highly anticipated body of new work.

Here, the botanical subjects that have peppered D’Onofrio’s canvases in the past are arranged into representational depictions of flora seated in large porcelain pots. The artist’s investigations in the canon of Europe's illustration masters, such as Basilius Besler’s (1561-1629) botanical encyclopedia Florilegium and Giovanna Garzoni’s (1600-1670) work, have been reconsidered as new compositions which allude to the legacy of botanical illustration while remaining mindful that images become kitsch with age.

Formal considerations in the representation of plants is the most immediately recognizable element in D’Onofrio’s newest body of work, as it is the nature of depiction most endemic to the history of botanical illustration. The stem of a plant may be presented as separated from its root, so that both items can be shown in their differing characteristics. Flowers and fruit may be painted at a range of blossom and ripening. Leaves of a plant can appear full and lilting. Perspective and depth are impacted for the purpose of education; such is the nature of illustration.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through May 14.

WHEN

WHERE

Galleri Urbane
2277 Monitor St.
Dallas, TX 75207
http://www.galleriurbane.com/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.