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Holly Johnson Gallery presents Jill Moser: "Borrowed Light" opening reception

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Image courtesy of Jill Moser and Holly Johnson Gallery

Holly Johnson Gallery will present an exhibition by New York-based artist Jill Moser. "Borrowed Light" marks Moser’s first solo show with the gallery and features recent paintings and works on paper.

Since the 1980s, Moser has been expanding and rewriting the legacies of gestural abstraction. Engaged with the work of choreographers and filmmakers including Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage and Teresa De Keersmaeker as well as women artists such as Lynda Benglis and Joan Mitchell, her works have been addressing the relationship between mark making practices, performative gestures, passages of time, and the moving body.

Most striking in this new work is Moser’s vibrant use of color, the light of this color borrowed from the history of painting from Pontormo to Warhol as well as the landscapes she has traveled in from Iceland to the East End of Long Island, New York. Borrowed Light for her, defined as "reflected light or the light entering a darkened space," is a provocation where nascent, almost animated figures hold a suggestion of pose, character, and voice.

The paintings’ vibrancy is also illustrated in the artist’s choice of materials. Paintings are executed in acrylic and oil on a ground of Flashe, a highly pigmented vinyl acrylic that is saturated and matte but also light absorbing. The works on paper are done with gouache.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display through May 7.

Holly Johnson Gallery will present an exhibition by New York-based artist Jill Moser. "Borrowed Light" marks Moser’s first solo show with the gallery and features recent paintings and works on paper.

Since the 1980s, Moser has been expanding and rewriting the legacies of gestural abstraction. Engaged with the work of choreographers and filmmakers including Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage and Teresa De Keersmaeker as well as women artists such as Lynda Benglis and Joan Mitchell, her works have been addressing the relationship between mark making practices, performative gestures, passages of time, and the moving body.

Most striking in this new work is Moser’s vibrant use of color, the light of this color borrowed from the history of painting from Pontormo to Warhol as well as the landscapes she has traveled in from Iceland to the East End of Long Island, New York. Borrowed Light for her, defined as "reflected light or the light entering a darkened space," is a provocation where nascent, almost animated figures hold a suggestion of pose, character, and voice.

The paintings’ vibrancy is also illustrated in the artist’s choice of materials. Paintings are executed in acrylic and oil on a ground of Flashe, a highly pigmented vinyl acrylic that is saturated and matte but also light absorbing. The works on paper are done with gouache.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display through May 7.

Holly Johnson Gallery will present an exhibition by New York-based artist Jill Moser. "Borrowed Light" marks Moser’s first solo show with the gallery and features recent paintings and works on paper.

Since the 1980s, Moser has been expanding and rewriting the legacies of gestural abstraction. Engaged with the work of choreographers and filmmakers including Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage and Teresa De Keersmaeker as well as women artists such as Lynda Benglis and Joan Mitchell, her works have been addressing the relationship between mark making practices, performative gestures, passages of time, and the moving body.

Most striking in this new work is Moser’s vibrant use of color, the light of this color borrowed from the history of painting from Pontormo to Warhol as well as the landscapes she has traveled in from Iceland to the East End of Long Island, New York. Borrowed Light for her, defined as "reflected light or the light entering a darkened space," is a provocation where nascent, almost animated figures hold a suggestion of pose, character, and voice.

The paintings’ vibrancy is also illustrated in the artist’s choice of materials. Paintings are executed in acrylic and oil on a ground of Flashe, a highly pigmented vinyl acrylic that is saturated and matte but also light absorbing. The works on paper are done with gouache.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display through May 7.

WHEN

WHERE

Holly Johnson Gallery
1845 Levee St.
#100
Dallas, TX 75207
https://www.hollyjohnsongallery.com/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.
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