Photo courtesy of Nasher Sculpture Center

In honor of Doris Salcedo’s designation as the inaugural Nasher Prize Laureate, the Nasher Sculpture Center presents an installation of her 2008–10 work Plegaria Muda.

Plegaria Muda (in loose translation, “silent prayer”) consists of long, narrow wooden tables that have been covered with a thick layer of earth held in place by a table of the same size and type turned atop it. In places, bright green blades of grass push their way through the overturned tabletop, into the light. These objects - some 30 in the Nasher’s installation - are arrayed by the artist in an irregular, mazelike grid, the narrow spaces of which the viewer traverses to experience the work as a whole. The size and proportion of the tables approximate the human body; their wooden forms remind one inescapably of coffins, and the earth interred in them in turn suggests the soil displaced from a freshly dug grave. Walking among the tables creates the impression of being in the midst of a cemetery, a place of mourning, memory, and reflection.

In honor of Doris Salcedo’s designation as the inaugural Nasher Prize Laureate, the Nasher Sculpture Center presents an installation of her 2008–10 work Plegaria Muda.

Plegaria Muda (in loose translation, “silent prayer”) consists of long, narrow wooden tables that have been covered with a thick layer of earth held in place by a table of the same size and type turned atop it. In places, bright green blades of grass push their way through the overturned tabletop, into the light. These objects - some 30 in the Nasher’s installation - are arrayed by the artist in an irregular, mazelike grid, the narrow spaces of which the viewer traverses to experience the work as a whole. The size and proportion of the tables approximate the human body; their wooden forms remind one inescapably of coffins, and the earth interred in them in turn suggests the soil displaced from a freshly dug grave. Walking among the tables creates the impression of being in the midst of a cemetery, a place of mourning, memory, and reflection.

In honor of Doris Salcedo’s designation as the inaugural Nasher Prize Laureate, the Nasher Sculpture Center presents an installation of her 2008–10 work Plegaria Muda.

Plegaria Muda (in loose translation, “silent prayer”) consists of long, narrow wooden tables that have been covered with a thick layer of earth held in place by a table of the same size and type turned atop it. In places, bright green blades of grass push their way through the overturned tabletop, into the light. These objects - some 30 in the Nasher’s installation - are arrayed by the artist in an irregular, mazelike grid, the narrow spaces of which the viewer traverses to experience the work as a whole. The size and proportion of the tables approximate the human body; their wooden forms remind one inescapably of coffins, and the earth interred in them in turn suggests the soil displaced from a freshly dug grave. Walking among the tables creates the impression of being in the midst of a cemetery, a place of mourning, memory, and reflection.

WHEN

WHERE

Nasher Sculpture Center
2001 Flora St.
Dallas, TX 75201
http://www.nashersculpturecenter.org/

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