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Photo courtesy of Nasher Sculpture Center

Swiss-born Mai-Thu Perret has spent the last 16 years making work born from a fictional feminist art commune she created called The Crystal Frontier. Set in New Mexico, the imaginary women of the commune make work that runs the visual gamut, from the painterly to the sculptural, often employing the aesthetic tropes of Modernism and aligning the women with utopian art historical movements. Her work in this exhibition will build off of a performance Perret recently staged in Geneva, which drew on the ancient Japanese puppetry form bunraku and elaborated a narrative involving a journalist, an Indian mystic, a 19th-century American Shaker, a 1950s computer programmer and an artificial intelligence.

The exhibit will be on display through July 17, 2016.

Swiss-born Mai-Thu Perret has spent the last 16 years making work born from a fictional feminist art commune she created called The Crystal Frontier. Set in New Mexico, the imaginary women of the commune make work that runs the visual gamut, from the painterly to the sculptural, often employing the aesthetic tropes of Modernism and aligning the women with utopian art historical movements. Her work in this exhibition will build off of a performance Perret recently staged in Geneva, which drew on the ancient Japanese puppetry form bunraku and elaborated a narrative involving a journalist, an Indian mystic, a 19th-century American Shaker, a 1950s computer programmer and an artificial intelligence.

The exhibit will be on display through July 17, 2016.

Swiss-born Mai-Thu Perret has spent the last 16 years making work born from a fictional feminist art commune she created called The Crystal Frontier. Set in New Mexico, the imaginary women of the commune make work that runs the visual gamut, from the painterly to the sculptural, often employing the aesthetic tropes of Modernism and aligning the women with utopian art historical movements. Her work in this exhibition will build off of a performance Perret recently staged in Geneva, which drew on the ancient Japanese puppetry form bunraku and elaborated a narrative involving a journalist, an Indian mystic, a 19th-century American Shaker, a 1950s computer programmer and an artificial intelligence.

The exhibit will be on display through July 17, 2016.

WHEN

WHERE

Nasher Sculpture Center
2001 Flora St.
Dallas, TX 75201
http://nashersculpturecenter.org/art/exhibitions/exhibition?id=297

TICKET INFO

Free-$10
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