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The Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum presents "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow" closing day

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Photo courtesy of The Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

The Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum presents a special exhibition, "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow," exploring the life of Black Americans in the 50 years following the end of the Civil War and the emancipation of enslaved African Americans.

Organized by the New York Historical Society, the exhibition takes visitors from the Civil War to the end of World War I and examines how Black Americans advocated for equal rights in a hostile system, showcasing artifacts, photographs, and media to illustrate these transformative decades in American history and their continued relevance.

By 1868, slavery had been abolished and all persons born in the United States were citizens and equal before the law. Efforts to create an interracial democracy, however, were contested from the start, and a harsh backlash ensued, ushering in the "separate but equal" age of Jim Crow during which a system of second-class citizenship and racial segregation was put in place across the nation. "Black Citizenship" concludes with an exploration of Black military service during World War I and the struggle for equality in the decades to follow.

The Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum presents a special exhibition, "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow," exploring the life of Black Americans in the 50 years following the end of the Civil War and the emancipation of enslaved African Americans.

Organized by the New York Historical Society, the exhibition takes visitors from the Civil War to the end of World War I and examines how Black Americans advocated for equal rights in a hostile system, showcasing artifacts, photographs, and media to illustrate these transformative decades in American history and their continued relevance.

By 1868, slavery had been abolished and all persons born in the United States were citizens and equal before the law. Efforts to create an interracial democracy, however, were contested from the start, and a harsh backlash ensued, ushering in the "separate but equal" age of Jim Crow during which a system of second-class citizenship and racial segregation was put in place across the nation. "Black Citizenship" concludes with an exploration of Black military service during World War I and the struggle for equality in the decades to follow.

WHEN

WHERE

Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum
300 N Houston St, Dallas, TX 75202, USA
https://www.dhhrm.org/exhibitions/current-special-exhibition-2/black-citizenship-in-the-age-of-jim-crow/

TICKET INFO

$12-$19

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