Art around the corner

Nasher Sculpture Center to celebrate a decade in Dallas with unprecedented public art project

Nasher Sculpture Center to celebrate a decade in Dallas with unprecedented public art project

The idea of public art in Dallas has been an ever-evolving one. Deep Ellum has long been a source for public murals and sculptures. NorthPark Center has an abundance of art to enjoy while you shop. And Shepard Fairey recently put his own imprint on the Dallas public art scene, albeit temporarily.

As part its 10th anniversary celebration, Nasher Sculpture Center continues in that tradition with Nasher Xchange, a public art project with 10 new sculptures created by 10 artists for 10 different areas of the city. The sculptures will be on display from October 19, 2013, to February 16, 2014.

 Nasher Xchange, featuring 10 sculptures by 10 artists for 10 areas of Dallas, will be unveiled October 19.

The commissioned sculptures come from a cross-section of artists, including three from Texas, three based in Los Angeles, three based in New York City, and one from the Netherlands.

Local artists include the Good/Bad Art Collective from Denton, a group of artists known for shocking and thought-provoking work, and Vicki Meek from Dallas, whose work inspires viewers to reflect on the African-American experience.

The 10 locations where the sculptures will be placed haven't been released yet, but Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, who spoke at the announcement, promises that the art will "touch all corners of the city."

Nasher director Jeremy Strick says that the sculptures won't simply be dropped in with no relation to location.

"Each of these artists was inspired by different geographical, cultural, social, historical, environmental and esthetic settings in Dallas," Strick says. "It is art created and inspired from the very essence and heart of our diverse communities."

The opening of Nasher Xchange will coincide with the official celebration of the Nasher's 10th anniversary, an October 20 event dubbed "10+" that will feature free access to the center from 10 am to 10 pm.

Nasher Sculpture Center Interior
Nasher Sculpture Center garden. Courtesy of Nasher Sculpture Center
Vicki Meek, Nasher Xchange
An example of Vicki Meek's work, part of the exhibit "On Death Row: Issues of Class and Race," which ran at ghe Gallery at the University of Texas at Arlington in 2000. Meek created a series of tables that represent different levels of perceived socio-economic status, each covered with newspaper and magazine clippings that chronicle discussions related to death row demographics. Photo courtesy of Nasher Sculpture Center
Nasher Sculpture Center Interior
Vicki Meek, Nasher Xchange