Baseball Style

Texas Rangers unveil $35 million ballpark reno and breakout snack for drunks


Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Capital One Club
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Capital One Club
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
 Capital One Club
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Ballpark in Arlington, burger
Photo courtesy of Globe Life Park
Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra
Ballpark in Arlington
Photo by Jonathan Rienstra

The Texas Rangers spent more than $35 million during the last three offseasons renovating the Ballpark in Arlington. This year, the focus was on the concourse behind home plate and a replacement for the Cuervo Club. It's no giant video board, but it's close.

The Capital One Club replaces the previous Cuervo Club above the concourse behind home plate. You will not forget who sponsors this club, as the Capital One logo is everywhere — in a classy way, of course.

Inside the club, the changes are apparent. The club is bigger, to be sure, but also more open and brighter. They removed some supports that used to get in the way of watching the game; bars are now on the sides. Also gone is the awkward center staircase, replaced with a more natural entrance on the left side of the club.

The overall square footage of the club grew from 8,100 to 9,100. There are also more bars and cooking areas.

The club also increased the number of permanent seats up front, from 76 to 104. These seats enable fans to get the view of the action from behind home plate without sitting out in the blistering heat.

The new concourse below the Capital One Club is named the 60 Foot Six, after the distance from the pitching rubber to home plate. It features an open walkway for those sitting behind home, as well as several concession stands with display areas to showcase the ridiculous foods they've concocted.

Case in point: these things. The Boomstick — a 2-foot-long sausage monstrosity — has offspring like the Beltre Buster and the Murph-A-Dilla. We recommend you split these between (at least) two people.

Down the concourse on the first-base side is The Chipper, serving buckets of potato chips smothered in various cheeses and toppings, The Chipper may be the breakout snack for drunk fans this year.

Of course the Rangers have a food truck. It'll be parked outside the gates for most games, but when it's not, it'll be rolling around DFW. You can even rent it for private parties, which admittedly sounds awesome.

Also new to the concourse is a shop between home and first. There is plenty of classic Rangers gear, plus new additions like a quarter-zip hoodie identical to the one players wear.

Oh, and there are hats. So, so many hats. There's even one with faux snakeskin on the bill, if you're into that kind of thing.

The dugouts and camera bays on both sides have also been widened, although it's probably a year too late, as Mike Napoli no longer roams the Rangers dugout looking for leftovers. 

In addition, a third row has been added behind home plate, meaning there are now 148 seats between the dugouts.