Walks Getting Canceled

Susan G. Komen for the Cure replaces Nancy Brinker with new CEO

Komen replaces Nancy Brinker with new CEO

Nancy Brinker of Susan G. Komen for the Cure
Nancy Brinker founded Susan G. Komen for the Cure in honor of her sister, who died of breast cancer in 1980.  Paula Froelich/Tumblr
Komen Houston Race for the Cure 2012
Under Brinker's leadership, running events have become a fixture of the cancer fundraising empire.  Photo courtesy of Komen Houston Race for the Cure
Judith Salerno is the new CEO of Komen
Judith A. Salerno is the new CEO of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Photo courtesy of University of Southern California
Nancy Brinker of Susan G. Komen for the Cure
Komen Houston Race for the Cure 2012
Judith Salerno is the new CEO of Komen

Nearly a year after promised, Dallas-based breast cancer foundation Susan G. Komen for the Cure has replaced Nancy Brinker as CEO. Stepping into the pink shoes is Judith Salerno, executive director of the Institute of Medicine.

Brinker isn't going anywhere. She'll remain with the organization, under a new title: starship commander — I mean, chair of global strategy.

Brinker's depose comes after a controversy-filled 2012, following Komen's 2011 decision to stop giving grants to Planned Parenthood. The decision caused an uproar, and the organization quickly changed its mind. But the ensuing deluge of criticism forced the resignation of its politically conservative vice president Karen Handel, and then Komen got hammered for one bad PR move after another.

Brinker claimed she would resign last August, but it seems to have taken another round of bad press to finally get her to do it. In May, the Dallas Morning News reported that she'd received a 64 percent raise, from $417,000 to $684,717. Salon wondered how Komen got away with it, and, on June 6, the Washington Post questioned why she was still the CEO.

Meanwhile, the sinking Komen ship announced that it would be dropping seven of its annual fundraising events/walks in Arizona, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Tampa Bay, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.:

This was a really tough decision, but we had to look at historical performance of each market, which included total number of participants and amount of money raised since 2009. The markets that did not meet these financial goals over that period were removed from the 2014 schedule.

Participation in the races has declined since 2011. The Dallas race at NorthPark Center is still on for October 19.