Peek Inside

Dallas builders parade out 5 of their most spectacular custom homes

Dallas builders parade out 5 of their most spectacular custom homes

Richard Miller custom homes, Parade of Homes 2018
This warm modern design by Richard Miller Custom Homes is one of five luxury homes showcased. Photo courtesy of Dallas Builders Association
Thomas Development homes, Parade of Homes 2018
This home by Thomas Development and Construction features a back kitchen, pool, and three separate porches. Photo courtesy of Dallas Builders Association
Prospect Homes, Parade of Homes 2018
The window and door design of this Prospect Homes build floods the home with natural light. Photo courtesy of Dallas Builders Association
Classic Urban Homes, Parade of Homes 2018
Entry to this home by Classic Urban Homes is actually through a courtyard, which allows an extra layer of privacy. Photo courtesy of Dallas Builders Association
Alexander Hunt homes, Dallas Parade of Homes 2018
The gourmet kitchen of this Alexander Hunt home has an oversized LED-lit quartzite island countertop. Photo courtesy of Dallas Builders Association
Richard Miller custom homes, Parade of Homes 2018
Thomas Development homes, Parade of Homes 2018
Prospect Homes, Parade of Homes 2018
Classic Urban Homes, Parade of Homes 2018
Alexander Hunt homes, Dallas Parade of Homes 2018

The creative folks belonging to the Dallas Builders Association are hired to build some of the most beautiful houses in the city, but rarely does the public get to see them, as their owners often are particularly private. But on one day this spring, DBA will open the doors to five high-end custom houses as part of its 2018 Parade of Homes.

The organization will host the tour from 10 am-5 pm on April 7. Featured homes are situated near the Bluffview neighborhood in Northwest Dallas and Lakewood, near White Rock Lake.

“Each home in this scattered-site, self-guided tour will be fully decorated and landscaped, featuring the very finest in innovative home building and custom craftsmanship,” said Dallas Builders Association President Alan Hoffmann of Hoffmann Homes. “Visitors will be able to tour these luxury homes, experiencing state-of-the-art technology, energy efficiency, and architectural design.”

The Parade of Homes benefits Operation Finally Home, an organization that provides custom, mortgage-free homes to combat-wounded U.S. military veterans and their families. The DBA has just broken ground on its sixth Operation Finally Home project and has a seventh planned for later this year.

Participating Parade of Homes builders are Classic Urban Homes, Thomas Development and Construction LLC, Alexander Hunt Distinct Homes, Prospect Homes, and Richard Miller Custom Homes.

Architectural designs include minimalist farmhouse, transitional, modern dogtrot, and warm modern.

“Today’s homeowners desire a balance between large open spaces, to spend time with friends and family, and individual retreats that offer privacy and relaxation,” notes Parade Chairman Michael Turner of Classic Urban Homes. “This is a universal theme throughout these five homes.”

Turner points out that today’s families are very environmentally aware. “Excellent energy efficiency is a given, and Parade attendees are going to see lots of natural light, abundant use of glass, and expansive outdoor living areas,” he said.

One of the homes is carved into the side of a hill overlooking a stream; another boasts a commercial water filtration system; a third offers a unique dogtrot breezeway that connects the main house with separate guest quarters.

Additional highlights showcased in the tour are powered shades, a wood-burning oven, custom cabinetry, steam showers, LED lighting, reclaimed wood features, a spectacular glass-topped wine room, and full home automation.

Parade of Homes tickets are $25 for ages 12 and older and are available at ParadeofHomesDallas.com. Tour maps will be emailed to ticket holders 48 hours prior to the event, and attendees will be issued wristbands that must be worn while visiting the homes.

---

A version of this story originally was published on Candy's Dirt.