Boom!

Texas added more residents than any other U.S. state in past year

Texas added more residents than any other U.S. state in past year

Texas flag
Texas added more residents from mid-2018 through mid-2019 than any other state. Marco Bicci/Getty Images

Yes, everything is bigger in Texas — including population growth. From mid-2018 to mid-2019, the Lone Star State added more residents than any other state, new estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show.

From July 2018 to July 2019, the population of Texas grew by 367,215, according to Census Bureau data released December 30. That’s close to the number of people who live in Arlington (398,112).

Keep in mind that this does not mean nearly 370,000 people moved to Texas in just one year. The Census Bureau’s new population estimates represent the number of people who moved to and moved out of each state, as well as the number of births versus deaths.

Texas’ 2018-19 population growth eclipsed that of the country’s largest state, California.

The Golden State saw its population increase by just 50,635 during the one-year period, the Census Bureau says. What’s behind the meager growth? From 2018 to 2019, California’s net domestic migration plunged by 203,414. Net domestic migration represents the number of people moving to a state versus the number of people moving out of a state.

Here’s another eye opener: Texas accounted for nearly one-fourth of the country’s population growth from 2018 to 2019 (1,552,022 people). In that time, 10 states lost population, including Illinois, New Jersey, and New York.

In July 2018, the Texas population stood at an estimated 28,628,666. By July 2019, that figure had climbed to 28,995,881, the Census Bureau says. On a percentage basis, Texas’ 2018-19 population growth (1.28 percent) ranked fifth among the states.

Perhaps more impressive is how much Texas expanded from April 2010 (when the last official U.S. headcount was conducted) to July 2019. During that period, Texas added 3,849,790 residents, according to the Census Bureau. To put that into perspective, nearly 4 million people live in the entire state of Oklahoma. Texas’ population jumped 15.3 percent from 2010 to 2019, the third highest growth rate behind the District of Columbia and Utah.

Experts cite economic and job growth — along with a low cost of living, a low cost of doing business, and low taxes compared with many other states — as drivers of Texas’ population boom. Helping fuel the boom are substantial population spikes in the state’s four largest metro areas: Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio.

In 2030, the state’s population is projected to approach 34.9 million, according to a forecast from the Texas Demographic Center.