House For Sale

Sure is a lot of wood paneling in this vintage Dallas house for sale

Sure is a lot of wood paneling in this vintage Dallas house for sale

8412 Suncrest
Family room has wood paneling, wood ceiling beams, and a wood bookcase. Courtesy photo
8412 Suncrest
The home at 8412 Suncrest Dr. has original features including period pale green shutters and iron details in the entry. Courtesy photo
8412 Suncrest
Dining room is a warm wood-lined sanctuary. Courtesy photo
8412 Suncrest
Bathroom has wainscoting-style wood paneling that stops halfway up. Courtesy photo
8412 Suncrest
This bathroom has original white tile. Courtesy photo
8412 Suncrest
There's even a room painted salmon to sympathize with the wood. Courtesy photo
8412 Suncrest
8412 Suncrest
8412 Suncrest
8412 Suncrest
8412 Suncrest
8412 Suncrest

There's a '60s house for sale in Dallas still in original condition that boasts a serious commitment to wood.

That includes: a wood-paneled living room, completely wood-paneled dining room, wood ceiling beams, even a wood-paneled bathroom. There's a lot of wood.

Located at 8412 Suncrest Dr., it's a 2,250-square-foot home built in 1962, with 6 bedrooms and 2-and-a-half bathrooms, and is listed for a whopping $419,000.

The house is in the Hillwood neighborhood in East Dallas, north of Buckner Terrace and White Rock Hills — all neighborhoods that have become more popular in recent years because the homes are well made and were, until recently, cheaper than a comparable house in Richardson or North Dallas.

This one seems to be hoping the current price mania and house shortage will work in its favor. The current most expensive house on the street is a flip that sold in 2020 after being listed for $379000, and homes on the street that have not yet turned over are still appraised in the low to mid $200s.

Nonetheless, it's great that they kept the house in original condition for the small (but surely growing?) number of buyers who can appreciate original features such as

  • wrought-iron trim at the front door
  • terrazo stone tiles in the foyer
  • charming leaf-patterned crown molding
  • impressively swirled ceilings
  • original fireplace made from the same long flat bricks as the house exterior with handsome brass details

The kitchen is dated though still functional, with formica countertops and white appliances — which are surely poised for a comeback? — including two stacked wall ovens and an old-school white gas cooktop. There's a separate laundry room right off the kitchen.

Everything seems to be in pristine condition.

The home also has two bathrooms with original tile but, unlike some homes from this era, they're not a kitschy-cool pink or pale blue, but are instead all white; one has a retro "clamshell" ribbed sink.

The wood
In its defense, the wood paneling is a gorgeous golden-tan with a smooth finish that would delight anyone seeking mid-century-modern authenticity, and easily beats those horrendous "rustic" mixed-wood walls that were such the trend a couple years ago.

There is:

  • a wood-paneled family room with fireplace, wood ceiling beams, and a built-in wood bookcase.
  • a dining room that's clad entirely in wood paneling, with a built-in wood china closet, built-ins being very much of that era.
  • a divine bathroom with wood paneling that goes halfway up, wainscoting-style, with the top half drywall painted white, so that you really appreciate the wood on the bottom; and a closet with a matching all-wood slatted door.

Between the kitchen and the dining room, there's a cool set of pocket doors, framed in wood and enclosing a period-era semi-translucent metal screen.

There is also an office of sorts that's been painted a mildly frightening salmon color, seemingly as a gesture of solidarity with the wood.

The odds seem high that someone will come in and bulldoze all this wood, but you never know. Surely there is one buyer who really likes wood?