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These Dallas businesses started by young professionals blow us away

These Dallas businesses started by young professionals blow us away

Blownaway stylist doing makeup
Blownaway sends professional stylists to you for blowouts and makeup applications. Blownaway/Facebook
Beard Supply Co.
Beard Supply Co. sells oils that leave beards smelling good and feeling soft. Photo courtesy of Beard Supply Co.
Blaine Bowen Jewelry, DFW, jewelry
The Blaine Bowen brand includes jewelry and apparel.  Photo courtesy of Blaine Bowen Jewelry
Michelle Hanson, Karley Kiker, Cassidy Woodard, Circle Seven Five launch
Michelle Hanson, Karley Kiker and founder Cassidy Woodard at the Circle Seven Five launch at Lublu.  Photo by Bo Joplin
HeartStories, Crystal Gornto
Crystal Gornto launched HeartStories so women could shut out the noise and connect with each other on a deeper level.  Photo courtesy of HeartStories
parqer, valet, dallas, app
Parqer allows you to pay the valet from your smartphone. Photo courtesy of Parqer
Nick Kennedy of Rise
Nick Kennedy's Rise is a private travel membership designed to alleviate the headaches of frequent business travel. Photo courtesy of Rise
StudioHop
StudioHop grants you access to multiple fitness studios for one membership fee. StudioHop/Facebook
Quixotic, dallas, menswear, pocket square
Quixotic pocket square company believes chivalry isn't dead.  Photo courtesy of Quixotic
VelvetCrate, gifts
Send quality care packages to your best girlfriend via VelvetCrate. Photo courtesy of VelvetCrate
Blownaway stylist doing makeup
Beard Supply Co.
Blaine Bowen Jewelry, DFW, jewelry
Michelle Hanson, Karley Kiker, Cassidy Woodard, Circle Seven Five launch
HeartStories, Crystal Gornto
parqer, valet, dallas, app
Nick Kennedy of Rise
StudioHop
Quixotic, dallas, menswear, pocket square
VelvetCrate, gifts

Before we put 2014 behind us for good, we are revisiting some of the Dallas startups founded by young professionals that we featured in the last year — in case you missed them the first time around, or if, like us, you enjoy reminiscing. From an app that revolutionized valet parking to a social club that helps people find their niche, these companies run the gamut, but they all help make living here great. 

Beard Supply Co
Beards are a big deal in this city. So Josh Read and Cody Murphey created a company offering oils that ensure those beards stay soft and smell good, and they offer free samples for the non-believers. Expect locally made beard wash and wooden beard combs to launch in the near future. 

Blaine Bowen Jewelry 
Blaine Muhl’s gameday accessories captured the attention of Seattle Seahawk Richard Sherman almost from the get-go — and soon she was selling out of them faster than they could be made. She has since grown her brand beyond jewelry to include graphic tees and other lifestyle items that are just as fun, flirty and fashion-foward.

Blownaway
Founder Smoot Carter put a pretty spin on the Uber business model to create Blownaway, a company that offers on-demand blowouts and makeup services. Now we girls can get quality ’dos from the comfort of our own homes — or wherever we happen to be. We just download the app, select a service and style, pick a time and place, and let the professionals come to us.

Circle Seven Five
In a city as big as Dallas, it can be hard to find your niche. Even Dallas native Cassidy Woodard was having trouble connecting when she returned from a stint in New York City. She started Circle Seven Five to help like-minded souls connect personally, professionally and philanthropically without all of the meeting requirements and expensive dues of social clubs such as as Junior League or Slipper Club.

HeartStories
Crystal Gornto is in the business of keeping it real, and we were smitten with her idea that helps women interact with friends on a deeper level than modern technology sometimes allows. The app allows women to connect with their closest girlfriends (10 or less) and let them know how they are really doing. Users can send an “I’m having the best day of my life” or “I’m on the verge of tears” message, which in turn hopefully triggers some type of real communication. 

Parqer
Attorney John Adolph came up with a solution to a problem we have all had at one time or another: no cash for the valet. So rather than heading to the ATM — or, worse, not tipping at all — we can now use the Parqer app to pay the valet online. No cash is required, even for a tip. The app is free to download.

Rise
Nick Kennedy created a company to help ease the pain of frequent business travel. Beginning at $1,650 per month, Rise offers unlimited flights between Dallas, Houston and Austin on an eight-seat Beechcraft King Air 350 jet. Although the private jets are pretty darn posh, Kennedy assures us that the time saved is the real benefit. 

StudioHop
Thanks to Natalie Wolfe, we no longer have to be bored with our fitness routines. Her StudioHop allows members to explore different workouts under one membership umbrella. Pay one fee ($100 for 10 classes or $150 for unlimited) and work out at any of the participating fitness studios, which range from yoga to Pilates to spin. You are bound to lose weight and satisfy your need for variety. 

Quixotic
Quixotic references Miguel de Cervantes’ character Don Quixote, to describe someone exceedingly idealistic or extravagantly chivalrous, and the term left David Novak inspired. He created a pocket square business that works like this: If you lose your pocket square during an act of gentlemanly valor, the company celebrates your actions by sending you another. Even better, 10 percent of Quixotic’s sales support U.S.-based women’s shelters.

VelvetCrate
This was definitely the year of the subscription box, and sisters Allison Loftus and Amy Sullivan did it right. Their VelvetCrate boxes are sure to score brownie points with the ladies in your life, thanks to an assortment of luxury items such as a journal from Rifle Paper Co., granola from Hippie Chow, perfumed shower gel from Lollia or a water bottle from bkr. Priced at $78, the boxes are limited in supply; once they’re sold out, the sisters create a new mix.