Art News

Major Dallas-Fort Worth art museums contribute masterpieces to Google Art Project

Major DFW art museums contribute masterpieces to Google Art Project

Vincent van Gogh's Seaves of Wheat (detail)
Vincent van Gogh's Sheaves of Wheat (detail), one of the works submitted to Google Art Project by the DMA. Photo courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art
Sicán ceremonial mask from Peru
The DMA also contributed this gold Sicán ceremonial mask from peru. Photo courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art
Vincent van Gogh's Seaves of Wheat (detail)
Sicán ceremonial mask from Peru

We trust you take the time to get out there and explore the richness of our city’s cultural institutions. However, now you can meaningfully browse the collections of three major Dallas-Fort Worth art museums the way we consume a lot of things these days: online.

The Dallas Museum of Art, the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth are the latest to join Google Art Project, a virtual art gallery that allows users to explore the world’s greatest works. Collectively they have added more than 1,700 high-resolution images to the project.

 The high resolution of the images and custom-built zoom enable people to see these works in ways never before imagined — or at least closer than the museum security guard has ever allowed.

Highlights from the DMA’s contributions include Sheaves of Wheat by Vincent van Gogh and a gold Sicán ceremonial mask from Peru. The Nasher, internationally renowned for its selection of modern and contemporary sculpture, submitted Auguste Rodin’s The Age of Bronze and Mark di Suvero’s Eviva Amore. The Amon Carter contributed an impressive 1,200 images from the greatest names in American art, such as Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent and James McNeill Whistler.

In Google Art Project, users can browse by artist’s name, name of the work, type of art, institution, country, collections or time period. The high resolution of the images and custom-built zoom enable people to see these works in ways never before imagined — or at least closer than the museum security guard has ever allowed.

With the My Gallery feature, enthusiasts can build their own personal collections, which they can share with others. There is also a tool to compare works side-by-side. To date, there are more than 57,000 objects to explore.

Google Art Project — which launched in 2011 in cooperation with international museums such as the Tate Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Uffizi in Florence — is part of the Google Cultural Institute, which is dedicated to creating technology that helps the cultural community bring their art, archives, heritage sites and other material online. The aim is to increase the range and volume of material from the cultural world that is available for people to explore online and, in doing so, democratize access to it and preserve it for future generations.