Twitter Foul

Dallas police retract false tweet claiming arrest of NFL player Aqib Talib

Dallas police retract false tweet claiming arrest of NFL's Aqib Talib

Aqib Talib
Aqib Talib was not arrested as Dallas Police originally stated. Photo via Black Sports Online
Synn Nightclub in Dallas
Synn nightclub in Dallas hosted an NFL Camp After Party on June 28. Photo via Facebook
Bottles at Synn Nightclub in Dallas
Yaqub Talib was reportedly throwing bottles at the club. Photo via Facebook
Aqib Talib
Synn Nightclub in Dallas
Bottles at Synn Nightclub in Dallas

Dallas police are backtracking after setting off national media coverage of the supposed arrest of NFL player Aqib Talib on June 29. The person who was actually arrested for public intoxication at Synn nightclub in Dallas was Yaqub Talib, Aqib's brother.

The misidentification appears to have started with Yaqub himself, who reportedly told police "that he played ball in the NFL."

 The misidentification appears to have started with Yaqub himself, who reportedly told police "that he played ball in the NFL."

Compounding the confusion was the fact that Synn was hosting an NFL Camp After Party at the time of the incident, and several witnesses to the drunk and disorderly conduct said Yaqub played for the Denver Broncos.

The jig should have been up when Yaqub presented his Texas driver's license for identification upon arrest. But instead of accepting the spelling on his official state ID, a Dallas police officer decided to "google the Broncos’ current roster for the spelling."

Once Aqib's name was attached to the arrest, Dallas police spokesman Maj. Max Geron sent out a tweet proclaiming ".@dallaspd arrest Denver Bronco Aqib Talib for public intox after he was throwing bottles causing a disturbance. Talib was danger to self." The tweet was picked up by NBC Sports Pro Football Talk, where Aqib's agent reported that the player was in bed and his brother, Yaqub, was in police custody.

It took Dallas Police about three hours to realize the error, at which point Geron tweeted out an apology. In a statement to media on June 30, Geron said the tweet was sent out "not in keeping with normal protocol."

"We regret that this incorrect information was sent and extend our apologies to Mr. Aqib Talib," Geron said.

The June 29 tweet is the first major mistake since Dallas police unveiled a new social media strategy. Officers are encouraged to use Twitter and Facebook as well as the department's blog to report on crimes in real time.

Chief David Brown touted the wide reach of police social media accounts at a June 23 meeting of the City Council's public safety committee.

"We have reached more people with Twitter and Facebook than we've reached with neighborhood watch and crime watch," the chief said at the time.