Art Scene

Museum of Biblical Art aims to bridge the religious gap with holiday exhibition and auction

Museum of Biblical Art aims to bridge the religious gap with holiday exhibition and auction

Carmaleta Whiteley, Carolyn Farb, Donna Weitzman
Carmaleta Whiteley , Carolyn Farb , Donna Weitzman Photo by Kristina Bowman
Lorrie Smith, Jeff Levine
Lorrie Smith , Jeff Levine Photo by Kristina Bowman
Pogir, April Cotton
Pogir , April Cotton Photo by Kristina Bowman
Julia Stjernstrom, Ara Dona
Julia Stjernstrom , Ara Dona Photo by Kristina Bowman
Suzanne Boch, Michael Grishman
Suzanne Boch , Michael Grishman Photo by Kristina Bowman
Becky Frey, Shelle Carrig
Becky Frey , Shelle Carrig Photo by Kristina Bowman
Lawrence Bock, Katy Bock
Lawrence Bock , Katy Bock Photo by Kristina Bowman
Hector Hinojosa, Clara Hinojosa
Hector Hinojosa , Clara Hinojosa Photo by Kristina Bowman
Kristi Kirkpatrick, Susan Rogers, Helen S. Towne
Kristi Kirkpatrick , Susan Rogers , Helen S. Towne Photo by Kristina Bowman
Kent Perkins, Scott Peck, Ruth Buzzi
Kent Perkins , Scott Peck , Ruth Buzzi Photo by Kristina Bowman
Carmaleta Whiteley, Carolyn Farb, Donna Weitzman
Lorrie Smith, Jeff Levine
Pogir, April Cotton
Julia Stjernstrom, Ara Dona
Suzanne Boch, Michael Grishman
Becky Frey, Shelle Carrig
Lawrence Bock, Katy Bock
Hector Hinojosa, Clara Hinojosa
Kristi Kirkpatrick, Susan Rogers, Helen S. Towne
Kent Perkins, Scott Peck, Ruth Buzzi

Seven years after a devastating fire — and a complete renovation — at the Museum of Biblical Art, curator and co-director Scott Peck​ was proud to announce the third annual 8x8 Holiday Exhibition and Auction. The event honored Edith Baker for her longtime support.

The brains behind the event, Jeff Levine, explained that the required size of 8x8 for the more than 100 silent auction works: "loosely symbolizes the Hebrew word for life but also the miracle of Hanukkah."

Levine's goal was to support the museum, of course. But more important, he wanted to bridge the gap between Jewish and Christian communities with a celebration of exquisite art, from sculpture to painting. 

Houstonian honorary co-chair Carolyn Farb echoed that sentiment: "It's important for us to have expressions of tolerance and understanding." 

The museum galleries were open for viewing, but the guests — including Katy and Lawrence Bock, Carmaleta WhiteleySusan RogersDoris Jacobs, Robert Tobolowsky, and Myra and Stuart Prescott  focused their eyes (and wallets) on the pieces in the silent auction.

During the auction, the artists' names remained a mystery; only when the winners retrieved their pieces at the end of the night did they see the signatures on the artwork. Among the participating artists were Gib SingletonGeorge Tobolowsky, Frederick Hart and J.D. Miller.

Before the live auction, Peck gifted honorary co-chairs Farb and Donna and Herbert Weitzman with a token of appreciation for their devotion to the museum.

After many more thanks, the live auction began, during which a piece by Ruth Buzzi and one by her husband, Kent Perkins, sold in a set for $1,000.