Beer News

FireWheel Brewing Midnight Ninja will kill you with smoothness

FireWheel Brewing Midnight Ninja will kill you with smoothness

Brad Perkinson
Brad Perkinson began FireWheel as a home brew in 2010. The Rowlett brewery is taking part in Dallas Beer Week next month. Photo courtesy of FireWheel Brewing Co.
Midnight Ninja
Midnight Ninja is a black ale with an ABV of 6.5 percent. FireWheel is unveiling it for public purchase in two weeks. Photo courtesy of FireWheel Brewing Co.
FireWheel kegs
FireWheel will host an open house November 14 as part of Dallas Beer Week. Photo courtesy of FireWheel Brewing Co.
Brad Perkinson
Midnight Ninja
FireWheel kegs

Brad Perkinson is hoping that a ninja gets to you soon. His Rowlett-based brewery, FireWheel Brewing Co., unleashes its second large-batch beer later this month, and the Midnight Ninja promises to be a dark as its name suggests.

“It’s got this dark color, but it’s really drinkable,” Perkinson says. “You get the chocolate and coffee flavors with a little bit of roasted barley, but at the same time it’s not so heavy that you can’t have three or four.”

But Perkinson cautions against getting too deep into the black ale. At 6.5 percent ABV, Midnight Ninja wields a sharper katana than its similarly flavored Irish brother, Guinness Stout. This is where the ninja might sneak up on you, Perkinson says.

 At 6.5 percent ABV, Midnight Ninja wields a sharper katana than similar Guinness Stout. This is where the ninja might sneak up on you.

Already available for tastings at a FireWheel brewery tour, Midnight Ninja makes its commercial debut in about two weeks, Perkinson says. He is still figuring out where he will unveil the tap, but he says that the Flying Saucer in Garland and Jack Mac’s Swill & Grill in North Dallas are potential spots.

FireWheel has existed in some form since January 2010, but its new Rowlett brewery kicked out the first beer, Texas Pale Ale, to the public three months ago. Perkinson says that when he originally wanted to scale FireWheel from more than just a home brew, the only breweries in the area were Rahr & Sons and Franconia.

But in the year that it took to get the permits and licenses, Lakewood Brewing, Deep Ellum Brewing and Peticolas Brewing came on the scene.

And there are even more breweries opening up in the next year. According to Perkinson, the newfound Dallas brewing culture has been competitive — but friendly.

“It’s that saying, ‘a rising tide raises all boats,’” he says. “We’re all just looking to put out good beers and take the taps away from Coors and those kind of beers.”

Perkinson hopes that the upcoming Dallas Beer Week will really open the public’s eyes to the craft brewing going on in the area.

The eight-day festival, from November 10-17, celebrates local breweries and beers. Perkinson says that FireWheel will host an open house on November 14 from 6-10 pm. The brewery has been working on putting together a biergarten in the back complete with a firepit.

Beside the Texas Pale Ale and Midnight Ninja, FireWheel will offer some of its small-batch brews, including a pumpkin ale, red ale and albino pumpkin ale.

“Last year was the first Beer Week, but it wasn’t very big,” Perkinson says. “Now we have all these breweries that have just gotten up in the last year. It should be really good.”